Oops

Today’s stitch reigns in my laundry room. I’m not a fan of laundry so this piece is the only thing that makes me smile when I go in there.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The stitched sample is a large red flower from a retired Linda Carter Holman piece (through Melissa Shirley Designs) with Fyre Werks (black lines) and Neon Rays (gray lines). It’s a great case study in the “rules” of needlepoint.

Generally speaking, I don’t believe in hard and fast rules of needlepoint nor do I appreciate the “needlepoint police.” That said, I have very strong POV’s on select things. For example, I believe plain needlepoint (umbrella term for basketweave, continental, tent stitches) belongs in every piece. It provides balance to what I truly love, which are beautiful decorative stitches. If someone disagrees with that POV, great! No harm, no foul. All of us are stitching projects for ourselves or ones we adore. It is up to the individual stitcher to stitch what she/he wants and how they want to stitch it.

That’s a really long preamble to my point. I’ve wanted to share this stitch with you for a long time but I held back because the stitched sample is technically not correct. I remember being explicitly told to slide the last stitch (of the gray lines) UNDER the pre-existing stitch. And that is what the diagram shows. (That is also sequenced for clarity.) The stitched sample? Not so much. Big oops and a big “oh, well.” It’s still pretty. And, even though it’s what I see whenever I stare at the piece (while avoiding said laundry), I still love the stitch. (In fact, I just put it in a new Stitch Concept I’ll be sharing with you in August).

This stitch will grab attention due to its size. I would love to see this as a Santa coat with Very Velvet (black lines) and Fyre Werks (gray lines). Consider it for a sampler with Soie D’Alger and Silk Lame. An overdyed silk floss and Petite Silk Lame make a dramatic and different approach for a large bird. It would make a great dollhouse roof with Silk Perle and a Kreinik Metallic.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, Purple Palm, Maggie, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Everything but the Kitchen Sink

Technically, this stitch is a composite of small stitches.  However, there are too many elements to name that make it wonderful.  As I was creating the diagram image, no other title that popped into my head after the first one seemed appropriate.  It truly is everything but the kitchen sink.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Believe it or not, the stitch includes only two threads and one bead.  The gray lines are Shimmer Ribbon; the black lines AND aqua lines are one strand of Impressions; the turquoise circles are gold beads.  The best sequence to use (and I say this from experience) is to stitch the gray lines first, followed by the black and aqua lines, and end with the gold beads.  Establishing the pattern with the gray lines will make the rest of it go much easier.  I swear.

Clearly, this stitch belongs in a space you want to draw attention to.  I used it on a dress.  It would make a great roof, Santa bag, sampler area, or grass area (without the beads).  It would also be wonderful as snow, but only if you want that snow to dominate the piece.  Have fun with it.  You can experiment with different sized beads for a more subtle effect.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides and stitch concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster. 45 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch! Enjoy!