Oops

Today’s stitch reigns in my laundry room. I’m not a fan of laundry so this piece is the only thing that makes me smile when I go in there.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The stitched sample is a large red flower from a retired Linda Carter Holman piece (through Melissa Shirley Designs) with Fyre Werks (black lines) and Neon Rays (gray lines). It’s a great case study in the “rules” of needlepoint.

Generally speaking, I don’t believe in hard and fast rules of needlepoint nor do I appreciate the “needlepoint police.” That said, I have very strong POV’s on select things. For example, I believe plain needlepoint (umbrella term for basketweave, continental, tent stitches) belongs in every piece. It provides balance to what I truly love, which are beautiful decorative stitches. If someone disagrees with that POV, great! No harm, no foul. All of us are stitching projects for ourselves or ones we adore. It is up to the individual stitcher to stitch what she/he wants and how they want to stitch it.

That’s a really long preamble to my point. I’ve wanted to share this stitch with you for a long time but I held back because the stitched sample is technically not correct. I remember being explicitly told to slide the last stitch (of the gray lines) UNDER the pre-existing stitch. And that is what the diagram shows. (That is also sequenced for clarity.) The stitched sample? Not so much. Big oops and a big “oh, well.” It’s still pretty. And, even though it’s what I see whenever I stare at the piece (while avoiding said laundry), I still love the stitch. (In fact, I just put it in a new Stitch Concept I’ll be sharing with you in August).

This stitch will grab attention due to its size. I would love to see this as a Santa coat with Very Velvet (black lines) and Fyre Werks (gray lines). Consider it for a sampler with Soie D’Alger and Silk Lame. An overdyed silk floss and Petite Silk Lame make a dramatic and different approach for a large bird. It would make a great dollhouse roof with Silk Perle and a Kreinik Metallic.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, Purple Palm, Maggie, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Open Squares

I created* today's stitch for a beginning student.  It was a great way give the student practice with the Continental stitch, stretch them a little bit with an easy decorative stitch, and add an element of style to the piece.  Win, win, win!

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The student used this stitch for the background of a cute little animal.  You could add a Rhodes square in the 3X3 intersection for a smoother corner. The stitched sample is a background on a Scott Church Creative piece (in progress). It includes DMC Perle Cotton, Flair, and Trebizond Silk. This stitch is wide open.  Use that openness to exploit beautiful canvas painting.  This stitch could help define a grassy area or help highlight the painting in a beautifully shaded tablecloth.  Don't be afraid to use a contrasting color for any of the threads.  Have fun with thread finishes and color!

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides and stitch concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster. 47 guides are currently available, including the brand new Decisions, Decisions, Passion Flowers and Royal Peeps, and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch! Enjoy!

* Note on "creating:"  This stitch may very well exist in a book or on another site.  I can't pretend that I'm the first person to think of any stitches I share with you.  I say "I created it" because I haven't stumbled across this stitch anywhere.

Diamonds. Duh.

As you know, I love diamond stitches for any number of reasons.  And, of course, my version of Pattern Stitching includes diamonds.

A classic approach is to utilize Plain Needlepoint in opposite directions, as illustrated by the diagram below.  This is a beautiful accent to any background or surface you want to minimize.  The stitched sample is the first version with Mandarin Floss on 18-mesh.  

To dress it up a little, I created a second version with select stitches over two rows (far right).  

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

I like the potential the second version represents.  I see all stitches in the same color, but the stitches over two rows in a different finish, especially metallic.  It's such a subtle touch that will make any area with this stitch recede but with a tiny sparkle that will still draw some attention to it.

These stitch diagrams, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster.  41 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Enjoy!

A Sweet and Simple #smallspacesunday

And a very sincere Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and Happy Holidays to one and all.  To get over the hangover of the holidays, here's a sweet and easy small space stitch that adds a little somethin' somethin' to what may be a boring space.

While this is an absolute riff on the Alternating Plain Needlepoint post I did a few weeks ago, there is something about the texture of the French Knots that make this stand out.  On the stitched sample below, you can see I had nothing but small spaces.  The French Knot texture, along with the thread color, helped further differentiate the area.

These stitch diagrams, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs and Zecca Designs.  28 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.  I'm hoping to have some definitive news to share about projects in the pipeline very soon!

Okay, back to whatever you are doing!  I hope it is not cleaning up as that is what children and grandchildren are for.  Hope you have/had a wonderful holiday.   Only nine months until next year's holiday finishing deadline!  Hurry!

 

 

The Smallest of All

At the heart of all needlepoint is the single, simple needlepoint stitch.  There are several names for what I call Plain Needlepoint.  You may see it called Plain Needlepoint, Tent, Basketweave, Half Tent, Continental, or combinations of those.  They are all variations of the same theme, specifically a single stitch laid diagonally (at a 45 degree angle) over an intersection from the lower left corner to the upper right corner.

Simply put, the methods vary in sequence, coverage, and look on the back of the canvas.  However, they all look the same on the front of the canvas.  The Continental and Basketweave are the two primary methods I use for Plain Needlepoint.  I recommend each for specific applications.

Basketweave is my primary and preferred method.  It provides consistent and even coverage on both the front and back of a canvas.  In addition, basketweave minimizes the need for blocking a canvas after it has been stitched.    

Basketweave.jpg

Beginning in the upper right corner, add a stitch.  Move to the row to the left and begin the second row of stitching…going down the diagonal row.  Repeat this sequence up and down the area, always on the diagonal rows.   The first diagram illustrates the concept.  The second diagram illustrates each diagonal row by color to clearly separate the rows.

The Continental stitch covers each horizontal row in sequential order, both across and down, ending with a similar look as Basketweave.

 

Starting in the upper right corner, add the first stitch and move across the horizontal row to the left.  When you complete the first row, you (literally) turn your canvas upside down and repeat the same stitch going back across the second row.  You alternate the direction of the canvas for each row.  (In the diagram, the canvas is upright for gray stitches and upside down for turquoise stitches.)

If you do the aquamarine rows with the canvas upright, the typical mistake is to start from the lower left corner and end in the upper right corner.  This results in one tiny vertical stitch covering the row on the back of the canvas, leaving the area open to light and an uneven appearance on the front of the canvas.

My preferred combination is Continental stitch for any single row of needlepoint, such as an outline, window frame, or simple flower stem.  For any areas wider or longer than one row in either direction, I use the Basketweave stitch. 

Plain Needlepoint is a classic and good looking stitch.  It is a nod to tradition and is quite elegant on its own, especially when used to add shading to an area.  I don't have that many rules about needlepoint.  However, I feel very strongly that all needlepoint projects should have spaces dedicated to Plain Needlepoint.  I love decorative stitches and Plain Needlepoint helps set them apart and gives the eye someplace to rest.  It's a matter of balance. 

These stitch diagrams, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!