A Sweet and Simple #smallspacesunday

And a very sincere Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and Happy Holidays to one and all.  To get over the hangover of the holidays, here's a sweet and easy small space stitch that adds a little somethin' somethin' to what may be a boring space.

While this is an absolute riff on the Alternating Plain Needlepoint post I did a few weeks ago, there is something about the texture of the French Knots that make this stand out.  On the stitched sample below, you can see I had nothing but small spaces.  The French Knot texture, along with the thread color, helped further differentiate the area.

These stitch diagrams, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs and Zecca Designs.  28 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.  I'm hoping to have some definitive news to share about projects in the pipeline very soon!

Okay, back to whatever you are doing!  I hope it is not cleaning up as that is what children and grandchildren are for.  Hope you have/had a wonderful holiday.   Only nine months until next year's holiday finishing deadline!  Hurry!

 

 

More Beads!

Snow stitches beg for beads.  Today's stitch finds its inspiration in earlier posts.  While I wholeheartedly recommend the Baby Bling stitch or Chopsticks (with beads) for snow, let's change the shape of the stitch in between the beads this week.

I present Beads with Diamonds.  

This is an open stitch that is perfect for the wonderful snow shading.  The light blue or gray shading will show through beautifully with this stitch.  Consider using a clear bead, such as Sundance Beads color 131, for the accent.  Frankly, I would use a light sheen Metallic, such as Flair, Frosty Rays, or Crystal Braid, for the diamond itself.

I'm including a couple of variations to (hopefully) inspire you.  The first adds an Upright Cross stitch to the center of the diamond.  I strongly recommend using two different metallics, one for the Upright Cross and one for the Diamond.  

The last variation leaves the center clear but fills in the diagonal stitch between the diamonds.

Beads with Diamonds Variation 2.jpg

It's all a matter of taste.  And your taste is perfect.  

These stitch diagrams, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  27 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

Fish Sticks

I'm not going to bore you with how long it took me to find this week's stitch.  The moral of the story is to not always associate certain stitches with specific themes.  Meaning, all of these stitches are great for animals but they are great for many other areas.  And vice versa.

Case in point.  I first used this stitch on a sailboat on Emma Williams Rooftops.  Not an animal in sight on that piece.  But...I saw a picture of the same stitch on a fish this morning and voila!  We have a #smallspacesunday.  And it's perfect...absolutely perfect.

And I have not a single clue as to its name.  And that's okay.  I present the Fish Stitch.

Fish Stitch.jpg

This diagram is slightly different from other #whimsicalwednesday diagrams to provide clarity on the steps (left side of diagram) and the compensation stitches (right side of diagram).  The core stitch is up four rows and over two rows.  Always start four rows down from the top!  After you create the first row of stitches, each subsequent horizontal row of stitches overlaps the previous row by a single row.  The compensation stitches are a tiny bit tricky because their angle will rarely match the angle of adjacent stitches.  

The thread combinations are endless.  The diagram is in two colors for clarity.  On the Emma Williams sailboat, I used Silk Lame and Fyre Werks (shown here on Instagram).  The soon to be famous fish (stitch sample can be found here) used a single thread, Silk Lame Braid.  It really depends on the area you are stitching. I hope you have the perfect space for this stitch, whether it is a fish or something else.  More importantly, I hope you enjoy it.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  27 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

A Small TBT

Today's TBT is the Encroaching Gobelin...on a Christmas tree...because it's never too early for Christmas*.

07.07.2016 TBT.jpg

Today's TBT features the Encroaching Gobelin stitch.

Diagrams for this stitch, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

*  Yes, there is such a thing as too early for Christmas.  Most big box retailers should take note of this fact.  

 

 

It's a (Small) Brick House

Today's stitch is a small version of the Cashmere stitch.  The Alternating Cashmere stitch simply alternates 4X2 rectangles, leaving one intersection available for an accent.

It's great for small houses, as illustrated by the stitched sample on Instagram.  Other ideas for areas include backgrounds for small pieces (ornaments, box inserts, eyeglass cases, etc), clothing in smaller areas (especially pants), boots (for any size boots), rooftops, or ground cover.    

So, a funny thing happened on the way to the accent stitch (the yellow lines).  While I charted it to be distinctly different, whether through contrasting color or contrasting thread type, when I stitch, I've been using the same thread as the remainder of the area for a really subtle end result. 

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy! 

Darn it!

The darning stitch is a fantastic glass stitch*.  I love how you can play with the width of the stitches based on the size of your window.  I'm sharing three variations today, offering ideas for different sized windows. 

Today's stitched sample on Instagram illustrates the first stitch.  It is a wider darning stitch I used for a very large window in a Sandra Gilmore piece.    

For a medium to small window, consider a darning stitch over two rows.  

I did this stitch in pairs as I like the way they look.  However, if you prefer your open space to be in smaller bits, feel free to use the over two pattern in single rows with the same offset pattern for every other row, instead of every two rows.

I suspect you have figured out where we will end for this stitch.  Yup...over one row. I was completely doubtful and uncertain the first time I did this stitch.  And I absolutely loved how it so delicately showed the shading, yet was still a stitch.  It's perfect for a tiny window.

I hope you have the perfect windows for these stitches!

*  Yes, I know I wrote about the darning stitch way back when.  I briefly mentioned I used it for glass but didn't elaborate.  Today, I elaborated.  :)

These stitch diagrams, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  20 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

 

 

Smaller than Small

Another often overlooked small space stitch is the Cross Stitch.  Because, really, what's more fun than plain needlepoint than plain needlepoint twice over the same intersection?

Cross Stitch.jpg

What sets the Cross Stitch apart is its unique ability to be a single stand alone stitch.  The diagram on the left side above shows the sequence for the individual stitch.  You can use it for an eye, a button, an earring, a flower center, or a star.  Use it for any single stitch that needs to stand apart, however delicately, from the area around it.  For use as a single stitch, it works best if the area surrounding it is a different color.  It also makes a great accent stitch in a larger pattern, illustrated by the stitched sample on Instagram.

The diagram on the right side shows a cluster of Cross Stitches.  This is perfect for a small area that needs texture yet needs to recede a little bit.  Consider it for groundcover in the distance on a landscape.  It also makes a great tree trunk, allowing the (more enjoyable to stitch*) leaves to stand out.

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  20 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

*  This author's opinion

 

Kneedlepoint

The Knit Stitch is, quite possibly, the most obvious, underused, and appropriate small space stitch for almost any situation.

It's Plain Needlepoint with columns alternating directions.  As its name suggests, it mimics knitting and is one of the cleanest ways to dress up Plain Needlepoint in a small space.

The most obvious use is for scarves, mittens, sweaters, and other articles of clothing.  There are so many wonderful wool threads available now that allow you to shade to your heart's delight, add fuzzy texture with a Bunca Brush, or stay with a traditional flat knitted look.  Some of my favorite wools include Amy's Burmilana, &more's Baby Alpaca, or Fleur de Paris' Bella Lusso Merino Wools.

The Knit Stitch also works well for small nature objects such as tree trunks, ground cover, or bushes.  It's fun to use two different colors to make more of a statement, say on a small Christmas tree ornament or a pair of socks.

Use your imagination and have fun with it.  It may be a small stitch, but it is a mighty stitch. 

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  Seventeen guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect space for this stitch and enjoy!

 

 

 

I Can See Clearly Now

I vividly remember when I was taught how to do glass by Wendy Harwood.  Like it was yesterday.

It was a glass jar full of candy on a Melissa Shirley stocking.  I loved the colors of the candies and looked forward to bringing them to life with bright threads.  In the back of my mind, I was bummed it wouldn't be clear the pretty candies were in a jar, but couldn't verbalize that thought.  Turned out it didn't matter.  Wendy shared a great solution that showed off the pretty candies in what was very clearly a jar.

Open stitches with Kreinik Metallics.

Jars, eye glasses, vases, windows...everything glass.  It was and is a great solution.  My go-to stitch for windows is Reverse Basketweave in a Kreinik Metallic Braid.  My favorite is #032 Very Fine Braid (#4) for 18 mesh and #032 Fine Braid (#8) for 13 mesh.

Reverse Basketweave.jpg

Another favorite glass stitch is Alicia's Lace.  It's Plain Needlepoint in alternating directions.  So easy.

Alicia's Lace.jpg

Experiment with some of your favorite open stitches and share what you learn with us!  I hope you enjoy this solution!

These stitch diagrams, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  Ten guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

P.S.  I miss you, Wendy.  A lot.

 

 

It's a Brick...House!

Today's #smallspacesunday features the Brick Stitch.  It is, quite possibly, the easiest stitch ever.  It can be done on the vertical or horizontal. 

Brick Stitch.jpg

It is also scalable.  The only caveat is to go over an even number of rows (to keep the bricks centered on each other).  The above example is over two rows; it is over four rows in the example below.  I wouldn't necessarily consider an over-4 brick stitch a small stitch, but wanted to demonstrate the adaptability of the stitch.

Brick Stitch Over 4.jpg

You can also skip rows if you would like to show the shading on the canvas or to make the stitching a little less dense.

Brick Stitch Skip.jpg

The last example is the trifecta!  It doubles up on the bricks, skips rows, and adds a small accent.

Brick Stitch Trifecta.jpg

As for use, this is a great stitch for bushes (especially in the background), ground cover, small area clothing, small area backgrounds, buildings.  

I am a big fan of plied cotton and silks.  I like using 4-ply on 18-mesh and 6-ply on 13-mesh for this stitch, along with my trusted laying tool.  There is something about the softness of the plies that make the final finish soft and gentle.  It also works well with stranded silks, such as Vineyard Silk or Pepper Pot Silk. 

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  Nine guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Be creative and enjoy!