MF17YO

Today’s stitch comes from a pillow I stitched for one of my favorite people, MF17YO (my favorite 17-year old). She’s adorable, just like this sweet and straightforward stitch.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The stitched sample uses Elegance (aqua lines) and Fyre Werks (turquoise lines) for a panel on an & more sayings canvas.

Its symmetry makes it an ideal architectural stitch, such as a floor, wall, tabletop, or roof. Consider using a solid matte thread, such as Elegance, silk floss, or wool for the aqua lines and add a second overdyed thread (floss or wool) in a slightly darker color for a bit of contrast. Alternatively, it would make a very handsome coat with Very Velvet and a Kreinik metallic.

If you want to really dress it up, consider replacing the turquoise lines with beads.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

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If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy! And please have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Layered Loveliness

Today's stitch is another background from a sweet small piece.  I love how the Flair expanded to fill the space so it looks like a full coverage stitch.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The stitched sample uses Flair (gray lines) and Elegance (yellow lines) on 18-mesh.  Using Flair as the base thread is an atypical choice for me.  In most cases, I use two stronger threads.

A semi-brief tangent on base threads (the gray lines in the diagram).  My go-to base threads for layered (and tramme) stitches are Very Velvet, Perle Cotton (size 3 for 13-mesh and size 5 for 18-mesh), Grandeur (for 13-mesh), Elegance (for 18-mesh), and Kreinik Metallics (size 16 for 13-mesh and size 12 for 18-mesh).  Each of those threads is well-defined and strong.  Strong is important because, in most cases, the base thread adds height and definition to the accent threads (the threads on top).  With any of these threads, the stitch is fairly open.  I say most cases because there are times I throw all of this out the window and use surprisingly light threads for layered and tramme stitches, like I did today.

So, back to today's stitch.  Since this is a typically open stitch, it would work really well for many architectural elements that can handle the texture (of the layered threads)...think roof, floor, ground covering, rug.  For these stitches, consider using any of the base threads I mentioned above and cover them with something a little different, as stitch combos are not all matte and metallic. Don't be afraid to incorporate threads with a less than smooth finish.  Ideas for accent threads include overdyed floss (or wool), Rainbow Linen (one of my favorite threads for a roof), or a subdued metallic such as Silk Lame or Petite Silk Lame.   

Traditional matte and metallic combinations would make great clothing, sampler, or large flower petals.  I love Elegance and Flair (as illustrated above).  I love the idea of Very Velvet and Fyre Werks (or Neon Rays).  Another idea is to add a bead to the single open intersections between the pairs of yellow lines.  That would up the glamour level quite a bit, especially for a flower petal.  

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides and stitch concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster. Click here to see the 20 newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Another #stitchingsunday

Welcome back to another episode of #stitchingsunday.  This recently added Sunday theme* highlights stitches from blog posts in current stitching projects.

I decided to put my money where my mouth was regarding the recent post about the Oblique Tied Diamonds.  The original version was large and in charge.  As mentioned in the earlier post, I wanted to try it as a house.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Today's version is much more subtle, as it uses Splendor and Elegance for the cross and the stitch tying it down (gray lines and aqua lines, respectively).  A single vertical stitch with Kreinik Metallics Fine Braid (#8) replaces the bead.  In the sample above, it's the front of a house.  I think it would also make a fantastic roof. 

These stitch diagrams, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides and stitch concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster. 43 guides are currently available, including the brand new Passion Flowers and Royal Peeps, and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch! Enjoy!

* Don't worry.  #smallspacesunday hasn't disappeared.  I want to mix it up a little.

Short & Wide

I can be overly focused on the traditional view of perfectly diagonal stitches (45 degrees) in needlepoint.  It's also clear I'm overly comfortable with straight stitches, as illustrated here, here, and here.  So, yes, I can get bored with myself, I mean my stitches.

This is when oblique stitches save the day.  The beauty of oblique stitches is they are often the perfect stitch for that odd-shaped space.  Today's stitch is a chevron stitch with oblique stitches and a skipped row.

Oblique Chevron.jpg

This stitch would be just perfect for receding landscape (mountain or greenery in the background), water, or sky.  Those are just some thought-starters.  The skipped row is essential here as it lightens the stitch and helps with the shading.  The subtlety here is beautiful.  Despite being minimalist, it makes you look twice.

The stitched sample on Instagram is me playing with threads for a background of a floral piece from Melissa Shirley.  I used Elegance and Crystal Braid on 18-mesh.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca Designs, and Patience Brewster.  30 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch.  Enjoy!

A Theme is Emerging

I am well aware I have a lot of Tramme and Beetle stitches in my work over time, but this month drives that point home in a borderline embarrassing way.  (Unless, of course, you really like Tramme and Beetles, then it is part of my plan!)

Meaning, yes, today's stitch combines Beetles and Tramme.  We knew it had to happen sometime. 

The stitched sample on Instagram is a retired Melissa Shirley fruit canvas.  I love me some fruit needlepoint.  You'll be seeing more of my fruit stitches in February, as they are great examples of open work (February's theme).

The stitched sample uses Elegance (gray lines), Flair (aqua lines), and Kreinik Metallics Fine Braid #8 (turquoise lines) on 13-mesh.  As you may know by now, I like a lighter touch, especially on background stitches.  Flair was a strategic choice.  I love the way that Flair lays flat.  It is a great base thread for Tramme.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs and Zecca Designs.  28 guides are currently available, including the newest Tea by the Sea, and more are in the pipeline.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Enjoy!

More Beetles

Today's stitch is a variation on a Beetle stitch.  By enclosing the individual beetles within borders, it makes for a fun look!

The stitched sample on Instagram uses Elegance and Kreinik Metallics Fine Braid (#8) on 18-mesh.  

I used lighter weight threads since it was a background stitch that I wanted to recede.  This stitch, with lighter weight threads, would also work for a floor as it can mimic tiles.  A student just used it on a seat cushion as the beetles offered a puffy look.  It would also make a beautiful water stitch with two metallics with similar color values.  

You could use this with heavier weight threads, such as Vineyard Silk or 6+ plies of strandable silk (such as Splendor) to give it some gravitas, say on a sampler, a piece of clothing, or a roof.  The symmetry of this stitch (via the vertical stitches) make it highly adaptable to almost any medium to large area.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for Melissa Shirley Designs and Zecca Designs.  28 guides are currently available, including the newest Tea by the Sea, and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

Horizontal Brick

Not the most clever of blog post titles, but it's early here.  :)

Today's stitch is one of those universal solutions.  Depending on the thread combination, it can be clothing, a background, a tabletop, a piece of fruit (as illustrated on Instagram), or foliage.

It's really simple.

As I mentioned earlier, the thread combination defines its use.  For an area you'd like to recede a little, I recommend a lightweight pearl silk or cotton, such as Elegance, Thread Gatherer Silken Pearl, DMC (or Anchor) Pearl #8 for the gray lines and a lightweight metallic for the yellow lines, such as Neon Rays, Shimmer, or Kreinik Metallics #4 or #8. 

For a more intense area, such as a coat, Very Velvet, Pepper Pot Silk, Vineyard Silk, or a multi-ply wool are great alternatives.  Flair, Frosty Rays, Kreinik Metallics #12 or #16 balance these threads well.  

On a separate but related subject, I would love to receive feedback on whimsicalstitch.com.  Please visit this link to fill out a short survey.  Thank you!

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

Patterns

This week's post is less about a specific stitch and more about how to mix patterns to fit rigid space definitions.  The backstory is someone asked me for a wallpaper stitch.  My first thought was some sort of huge, open, and fun stitch (my favorite).  Turns out the wallpaper was really columns surrounded by single vertical rows painted in a different color.  This person needed three stripe stitches to fit an overarching wallpaper.  A completely different request, but a great opportunity to mix things up a little.

The trick was to define the dimensions of the individual spaces, find a pattern, and mix stitches to fit that pattern.  Turns out the column width pattern was 10, 2, 3, 2, 10, 2, 3, 2, 10 with a row of plain needlepoint on either side of every column.  So, I needed three stitches, one ten rows wide, two rows wide, and three rows wide.

Here's where I landed.

Clearly, the 10 row column has the most stitching potential.  Any pair of 5X5 squares would fill the width of the space.  A smaller pattern, such as the Star OctagonWoven Hungarian, or even a Tramme stitch would fit.  It's all a matter of personal taste.

The smaller columns are best handled in traditional stripe stitches.  But, don't be afraid to mix it up on the direction.  Mix diagonal and horizontal for a little change of pace.  You could do the over-2 columns in a single row of Tramme, or fill them with Smyrna Crosses from top to bottom.   

In terms of threads for backgrounds, I tend to understate the threads.  The stitched sample on Instagram illustrates the above diagram with a cream Subtlety.  I've seen versions of these columns with the all the columns in a matte thread and the gray lines are in a light sheen metallic.  The small splash of a muted metallic was a nice touch.  The final determination is the space you are stitching.  These are simply thought-starters.

These stitch diagrams, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

 

 

It's an Explosion!

Welcome to June, the month of whatever stitch strikes my fancy.  We kick off June with what I call the Explosion Stitch.  Its origin is "The Potpourri of Pattern" by Ann Strite Kurz, one of my favorite pattern books.  Ann does a lovely job of combining patterns for a stunning effect.  Yet, I find the individual patterns just as intriguing.

This pattern creates a beautiful trellis.  I find the trellis pattern surprising, simply because no stitch in this pattern is more than over two rows.  Yet, it fills a large space quickly.  I prefer to leave the open diamonds just that...open.  

As always, the fun begins with what stitch to put in the intersection.  If you want to keep the diamond shape, I suggest the alternating tent stitches in the main diagram.  You can dress it up with beads or add some texture with a Smyrna Cross.  Be sure to have fun with the bead sizes.  A really large bead, such as #6 or #8, would be a wonderfully dramatic touch for the single bead center.

My preferred thread combination is a matte thread, such as Pepper Pot Silk or Silk Pearl for the gray lines, and a contrasting metallic for the yellow centers.  The stitched sample on Instagram uses Elegance and Kreinik Metallics Fine Braid #8 in a vintage metallic finish. 

On a separate but related subject, I would love to receive feedback on whimsicalstitch.com.  Please visit this link to fill out a short survey.  Thank you!

This stitch diagram, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!

Starry, Starry Night

This is a new favorite sky stitch I uncovered in a book last Fall.  It had the clever name of Sky #14.  I made a couple adjustments and renamed it Starry Night Sky.

Clearly, it is for a large space.  This is funny considering how technically small the canvas is on which I first used this stitch.  And, yes, the canvas was mostly sky.  You can get a glimpse of it on Instagram.

I added space in between the large stars to soften the geometric look of the original pattern.  I also added the cross stitches in a different color to mimic stars.

Unlike other whimsicalstitch.com stitch diagrams, I did not add compensation stitches because I didn't want to distract you from the large pattern of the stitch.  It's important to note the stitches comprising the star do not cross over each other.  They share the same center hole.  The stitch sequence helps clarify this point.  

Starting from the outer edge, take every stitch from out to the center hole (indicated by the gray square).  So, every even numbered step in the above diagram is the center hole.  Because all stitches end in the center hole, it's important to use a lighter weight thread so you do not stretch the hole too much.  The stitched sample on Instagram uses Elegance on 18-mesh canvas. 

These stitch diagrams, along with other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on www.pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday.  

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells stitch guides for seasonal Melissa Shirley designs.  22 guides are currently available and more are in the pipeline.

Enjoy!