Lucky Me!

I always enjoy visiting and teaching at Bedecked and Beadazzled. The customers are a blast, Ruth is a great hostess, Johnny, and I always come home with new stitches (and stitched samples) to share with you! Win, win!

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Today’s stitch is from Ruth’s gorgeous guide* for Patio Table by Annie O’Brien Gonzales (distributed through Melissa Shirley Designs). It uses Petite Silk Lame (aqua lines) and Princess Perle (black lines). (* I say gorgeous because I saw the student’s exquisite work in progress.)

This stitch will work with so many thread combos. More often than not, I use strong single strand threads such as Kreinik Metallics, Vineyard Silk, or Elegance as the base thread (aqua lines). I use these because they are heavy enough to be visible in the areas between two beetles. And, similar to Ruth’s version, I cover it with another single strand thread, often a metallic.

Ruth used this stitch for a tabletop and I love how it complements the original canvas design in that area. Extending the tabletop idea, it would also make a gorgeous tile floor with silk perle, such as Elegance, and Straw Silk (!) on top for a rough-ish looking floor or even a silk floss for a smoother floor. I would love to see it as a coat with a heavy Kreinik (such as size 16 or even the 1/8” ribbon) for the base thread and Very Velvet for the beetles. Consider alternating the top threads by color or finish in every other column for the coat as well.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, Purple Palm, Maggie, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Challenging Myself

I love any and all tramme stitches, sometimes referred to as layered stitches. I can whip out a straight tramme stitch as a solution for almost anything. I’m not so good at diagonal tramme, so I love sharing this one with you.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Today’s inspiration comes from Ruth Schmuff at Bedecked and Beadazzled. It uses two plies of silk floss on 18-mesh.

A quick distinction between layered and tramme. For me, base threads from edge to edge (gray lines) distinguish tramme stitches from layered stitches. (Visit this blog post I wrote about tramme for insight on the history of tramme.)

This stitch would make a great architectural stitch, such as a roof or floor. Thought starters for threads for a roof are overdyed wool (ThreadWorx, Lorikeet) for the base threads (gray lines) covered with a solid Rainbow Linen (turquoise lines). Petite Silk Lame (gray lines) and Elegance or Subtlety (turquoise lines) would make a great combo for a floor or wallpaper. For a dramatic look on clothing, consider a single strand silk such as Vineyard Silk or Pepper Pot Silk (gray lines) covered with a heavier metallic such as Kreinik size 12 or 16.

If you want to go really crazy, consider making the center diagonal stitch (in the groups of three) a string of 4-5 beads. Just a fun thought that I WILL be trying someday.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, Purple Palm, Maggie, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Ruth 1; Me, 1/2

Today’s stitch is a case study in how teachers learn from teaching.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

The stitch and stitched sample are from our friend, Ruth Schmuff, at Bedecked and Bedazzled. The stitch uses Gloriana Silk Floss on 18-mesh for a background on an elegant geisha.

So, those of you who I’ve worked with in class have heard me say, “For any layered stitch, such as a cross stitch or an Upright Tied Cross, it doesn’t matter what direction you do it. Just be consistent.” And, of course, Ruth does it differently, yet is smart about it. Take a close look at the diagram and note the top stitches are in opposite directions. The top stitch on the vertical version goes from lower right to upper left while the horizontal version goes from lower left to upper right. It’s not the way I would have diagrammed it BUT it is consistent and that is what is important. Ruth, 1. Me, 1/2.

This stitch would be great for a basket with Lorikeet or ThreadWorx wool There are many outdoor applications, such as a tree or mountainside. It will make a wonderful rustic roof with Rainbow Linen or Caron Collection Watercolours.

If you want to glam it up, consider adding a bead in the open intersection where the top stitches meet. Since the stitch is rather large and it’s a single intersection, I recommend a slightly larger bead (or crystal) to make sure it doesn’t get lost in the rest of the stitch. For example, consider a size 8 bead for 13-mesh and a size 11 bead for 18-mesh. This glam version would be fantastic for a Santa coat or an elegant dress with silk floss and an appropriate bead. There is something exquisite about red silk floss and gold beads.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsSandra Gilmore, Purple Palm, Maggie, and Patience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!

Travelling Girl

This week's stitch also comes from recent travels. It's bright, cheerful, and fun...something we always expect from our friend, Ruth Schmuff.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Pinterest account. Visit pinterest.com/whimsicalstitch/whimsicalwednesday for a library of all #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Click on image to see on whimsicalstitch.com's Instagram account. Visit instagram.com/whimsicalstitch to see a library of stitched samples for select #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams.

Today's stitched sample is a Triple Alternating Nobuko with a single strand of Floche (on 18-mesh). The stitch is one of many Nobuko variations. This larger version is a great all-purpose stitch. It includes an intriguing pattern, is scalable, and can be understated or much more. (Here's another Nobuko variation just for the heck of it.)

The sample is the background for a fun Zecca piece*. Leaving the stitch open adds subtlety, allowing it to recede a bit into the background. This simpler version would make a great background (obviously), sky, tabletop, roof, green field, or pathway. The stitches in this pattern go in two directions; consider using two threads, one for each direction. You could use a matte and a metallic, or two completely different colors.

If you want to dress this up a little, add your favorite metallic in the empty rows. If you want to dress it up a lot, add beads in the empty rows! Combinations like those two would make wonderful clothing or bags. I would love to see this as a Santa coat or a witch dress with a with a rich Very Velvet or Pepper Pot Silk along with a heavier metallic such as Kreinik 1/16" ribbon (for 13-mesh). Soie D'Alger and a size 15 crystal bead would be perfect for 18-mesh.

This stitch diagram, along with all other #whimsicalwednesday and #smallspacesunday stitch diagrams, can also be found on a Pinterest board here.

Be sure to follow whimsicalstitch.com on FacebookPinterestInstagram, and Twitter.

If you like what you see on this blog, want to learn some very creative decorative stitches, and how to put them all together, whimsicalstitch.com sells Stitch Guides and Stitch Concepts for Melissa Shirley Designs, Zecca DesignsPatience Brewster, and many more. Click here to see the newest guides and click here to see the entire collection.

I hope you have the perfect spot for this stitch!  Please enjoy!  

* "A fun Zecca piece." Let's acknowledge this is a redundant statement.

A Note about Diagrams
I use color in diagrams to make them as clear as possible.  The primary function of different colored lines is to illustrate a stitch sequence.  For example, layering of colors demonstrates you add them in that order.  They can also provide ideas on how to integrate additional threads (one line for each color).  Or, you can use the same thread for all color lines.  That's where I encourage you to use your imagination for the space you are stitching!